Iwashi Senbei: Japanese Fish Cracker using Dried Sardine

When I went on errands yesterday, I saw Iwashi Senbei (いわしせんべい/鰯煎餅) on sale for the first time in a long time in a supermarket.

Senbei usually uses non-glutinous rice called Uruchi-Mai (うるち米) as its main ingredient, but there are some exceptions, and this variant is among them.

Iwashi Senbei (いわしせんべい)

Iwashi Senbei from Kaneishi Foods

Iwashi (いわし/鰯) is the word for sardine in English, and Iwashi Senbei is a traditional Japanese fish cracker using dried sardine.

Iwashi Senbei Crackers

I used to eat these crackers as a kid, but I rarely saw them sold recently. So when I found this product, I felt a little glad.

Iwashi Senbei Fish Crackers

Iwashi Senbei is glazed with a sweet soy sauce using mirin and coated with white sesame seeds. And because of the glaze, the surface of this snack has a shine.

Iwashi Senbei Japanese Sardine Crackers

These sardine crackers are pleasantly crunchy and have the same delicious taste as I remember. This treat is sweet and savory, and I liked it as well as the Kin no Almond Fish snack.

Ingredients/Nutrition Facts

Kaneishi Iwashi Senbei Ingredients Nutrition Facts

Lastly, for your information, here are the specific ingredients and nutrition facts of the Iwashi Senbei from Kaneishi Foods.

Ingredients
Dried sardine, Sugar, Starch hydrolysate, Soy sauce, Starch syrup, Sesame seed, Mirin (sweet cooking rice wine), Salt, Seasoning (Amino acid), Spice extract (Partially including Wheat, Soybean, and Sesame)

Nutritional Values

Nutritional Values per 100 Grams
Calories 413 kcal
Protein 49.4 g
Fat 8.8 g
Carbohydrates 34.0 g
Salt equivalents 0.68 g

(Reference Page: Wikipedia 煎餅 )

Tomo

Hi, I'm Tomo, a Japanese blogger living in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. For the purpose of enriching your life, I would like to introduce things about Japan on this blog, especially unique Japanese products, cooking recipes, cultures, and facts and trivia.

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