Ninjin: Classic Puffed Rice Snack in Carrot-like Packaging

“Dagashi (駄菓子)” is a snack genre unique to Japan made up of relatively small, cheap, unique Japanese snacks and candies.

In general, the price of those treats ranges from 10 (about 0.1 USD) to about 100 yen (about 1 USD), and Dagashi is especially popular with children.

Dagashi has a long history, and today, it comes in numerous varieties.

Accordingly, there are many famous Dagashi snacks that have long been loved, which include these classic treats.

Since Dagashi is marketed mainly towards children, some products are sold in lovely packaging.

Among those, what I introduce here, “Ninjin (にんじん)” features a unique orange package that draws people’s attention.

Yaokin Ninjin Sweet Rice Puffs

Yaokin Ninjin

The Dagashi, Ninjin contains snacks in a carrot-like translucent plastic package.

The word “Ninjin (にんじん)” actually means “carrot” in Japanese, so the packaging is literally shaped like a carrot.

Despite the name of Ninjin and the carrot-like package, it contains a bunch of sweet rice puffs, as shown in the picture above.

The texture of the puffed rice is light and crisp but not that puffy.

Yaokin Ninjin Puffed Rice Snack

Yaokin Ninjin Rice Puffs

This long-selling Dagashi Ninjin is sold by Yaokin, a Japanese Dagashi seller known for Umaibo corn puff sticks, and only costs 30 yen (about 0.3 USD) in Japan.

These rice puffs have a pleasant texture with the right amount of sugar and are reminiscent of Japan’s good old days.

For that, this Dagashi is recommended to Japanese snack lovers as well as children.

Ingredients

Yaokin Ninjin Dagashi Snack Ingredients

Lastly, according to the ingredient list on the plastic bag, the Dagashi Ninjin is a simple snack food made only with 4 ingredients, rice, sugar, starch syrup, and salt.


Tomo

Hi, I'm Tomo, a Japanese blogger living in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. For the purpose of enriching your life, I would like to introduce things about Japan on this blog, especially unique Japanese products, cooking recipes, cultures, and facts and trivia.

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